On March 9, 2020, the Canadian Center for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS) posted a podcast entitled “The Hazards of Nanomaterials and How to Control Exposure.”  CCOHS states that nanomaterials have many useful properties, but the same properties that make them desirable in manufacturing present unique potential safety hazards when workers are exposed

On March 23, 2020, the European Commission’s (EC) Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety (SCCS) announced that the fact sheet on the SCCS Guidance on the safety assessment of nanomaterials in cosmetics is now available in French, German, Italian, and Spanish.  The guidance provides recommendations for the safety assessment of nanomaterials intended for use in

On March 16, 2020, the Dutch National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) announced publication of an article in the May 2020 issue of Environmental Research entitled “Nanoparticle exposure and hazard in the ceramic industry:  an overview of potential sources, toxicity and health effects.”  In the article, the researchers provide an

The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has published standard ISO/TS 19808:2020, “Nanotechnologies — Carbon nanotube suspensions — Specification of characteristics and measurement methods.”  The standard specifies the characteristics to be measured of suspensions containing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (carbon nanotube suspensions).  The standard includes the essential and additional characteristics of the carbon nanotube suspension,

The European Commission’s Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety (SCCS) announced on March 3, 2020, that the April 2020 issue of Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology includes “The SCCS guidance on the safety assessment of nanomaterials in cosmetics.”  The highlights state that:

  • The guidance provides an overview of the key issues and data requirements relating

On March 3, 2020, the European Union (EU) Observatory for Nanomaterials (EUON) published a Nanopinion entitled “‘Nanoplastics’ — it’s a name game.”  Claire Skentelbery, Director General, Nanotechnology Industries Association (NIA), reviews the difference between engineered (manufactured) nanomaterials and naturally originating (incidental) nanomaterials.  Skentelbery notes that use of the term “nanoplastics,” without describing their

The Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (BAuA) issues Technical Rules for Hazardous Substances (TRGS), which reflect the state of technology, occupational safety and health, and occupational hygiene, as well as other verified scientific knowledge relating to activities involving hazardous substances, including their classification and labeling.  BAuA has published an English translation of TRGS

The European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) issued a press release on February 24, 2020, stating that it has received a low number of registration dossiers for nanomaterials.  ECHA states that it has received only 95 unique submissions for 36 substances covering nanoforms according to the updated Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) regulation requirements. 

On January 28, 2020, the European Union (EU) published The NanoDefine Methods Manual, a collection of three Joint Research Center (JRC) reports developed within the NanoDefine project “Development of an integrated approach based on validated and standardized methods to support the implementation of the EC recommendation for a definition of nanomaterial.”  According to the

On February 13, 2020, the Nanotechnology Industries Association (NIA) published a position paper entitled ‘Nanoplastics’:  Use of suitable terminology for representation in waste, degradation of plastics and presence in the environment.  In the paper, NIA and its members urge caution and clarity when referring to plastics as small particles or fragments.  NIA states that