On October 22, 2012, Safe Work Australia announced the availability of a report entitled Human Health Hazard Assessment and Classification of Carbon Nanotubes, as well as an information sheet on the report. The report recommends that multi-walled carbon nanotubes should be classified as hazardous unless toxicological or other data for specific types imply otherwise. The National

Japan’s Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) established a Committee on Safety Management for Nanomaterials, which was scheduled to hold its first meeting on December 2, 2011. METI states that it established the Committee “on the basis of the results obtained from the project ‘Research and Development of Nanoparticle Characterization Methods’ commissioned by the New

Australia’s National Industrial Chemicals Notification and Assessment Scheme (NICNAS) announced on September 28, 2011, the availability of a review of the 2007-2009 literature on toxicological and health effects relating to six nanomaterials. NICNAS commissioned the review and analysis of literature concerning fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and nanoforms of zinc oxide, titanium dioxide, cerium oxide, and silver. According to NICNAS, it chose these nanomaterials because it considers them “to already be in, or close to, commercial use in Australia.”  The goal of the review was to identify any available scientific evidence of important toxicological/health effects that had not been covered by the scope of previous reviews and therefore supplement currently available scientific information on these substances.


Continue Reading Australia Publishes Literature Review Relating to Six Nanomaterials

Inhalation Toxicology has published an article entitled “Exposure assessment of workplace manufacturing nanosized TiO2 and silver,” which monitored the possible exposure to nanoparticles at workplaces that manufacture nano-titanium dioxide (TiO2) and nano-silver.  The abstract states:

To estimate the potential exposure of workers, personal sampling, area monitoring, and real-time monitoring using

Australia’s National Industrial Notification and Assessment Scheme (NICNAS) recently issued guidance on the new chemical requirements for the notification and assessment of industrial nanomaterials that are considered to be new chemicals. The new administrative arrangements will be effective from January 1, 2011, and will apply to any new chemical that falls under the following working

In an October 5, 2010, Chemical Gazette notice, the National Industrial Chemicals Notification and Assessment Scheme (NICNAS) announced that it is introducing new administrative processes for the notification and assessment of industrial nanomaterials that are considered to be new chemicals. The new administrative arrangements will be effective from January 1, 2011, and will apply to any new chemical that falls under the following working definition of “industrial nanomaterial”:

. . . industrial materials intentionally produced, manufactured or engineered to have unique properties or specific composition at the nanoscale, that is a size range typically between 1 [nanometer (nm)] and 100 nm, and is either a nano-object (i.e. that is confined in one, two, or three dimensions at the nanoscale) or is nanostructured (i.e. having an internal or surface structure at the nanoscale).


Continue Reading Australia Announces Adjustments To NICNAS New Chemicals Processes For Industrial Nanomaterials

On November 9, 2009, Australia announced the availability of a public discussion paper proposing to strengthen regulation of industrial nanomaterials used in Australia. The National Industrial Chemicals Notification and Assessment Scheme (NICNAS) developed the proposal in conjunction with its Nanotechnology Advisory Group, which includes representatives from industry, the community, and research sectors. Major regulatory reforms would include:

On April 14, 2009, the Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU) issued a press release entitled “Nanotech Poses Possible Health and Safety Risk to Workers and Needs Regulation.” According to ACTU, “[t]he rapidly growing nanotechnology market in Australia requires urgent regulation to protect the health and safety of workers and consumers.” ACTU notes that, currently, there is no mandatory register in Australia of who is importing, manufacturing, supplying, or selling nanomaterials, and no requirement to label products.


Continue Reading Australian Unions Call for Regulation of Nanomaterials

The American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) will hold a webinar entitled “Nanotechnology Health and Safety: Case Studies in the Occupational Setting” on December 4, 2007. The webinar will discuss the uncertainties associated with the hazards and potential risks of working with engineered nanoparticles; describe ways to help manage exposure to engineered nanoparticles; and illustrate how occupational health and safety controls, both engineering and administrative, can be implemented to manage better worker health and safety.  Additionally, the webinar will present case studies that will highlight how select organizations that use engineered nanoparticles in production facilities (metal oxide and metal alloy), as well as research laboratories, are addressing the safety and health issues behind this new technology.
Continue Reading ACGIH Will Present Webinar on Nanotechnology Health and Safety